>> SELECTED PROJECTS

#22 Periscope Tower

Makes it possible for everyone to enjoy the views of the surrounding landscape

Extract from our publication News in Nordic Architecture

“One can either climb up the stairs and enjoy the view over the lake and the landscape from the viewing deck, or stay on the ground floor and see the view through the periscope mirror”

Architect: OPPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture . 2016 . Seinäjoki, Finland . 35 m2 . Photos by Anssi Lassila

 

  

>>SELECTED PROJECT

#21 Malmö Market hall

The old freight depot from 1898 was no more than a roofless shell when the developer decided to turn it into a market hall.

Extract from our publication News in Nordic Architecture

“A gap in the roof between the new and existing building allows daylight into the old brick facade, while the facade cladding of weathered corrugated steel echoes the industrial environment which has historically dominated the district.”

Architect: Wingårds Arkitektkontor . 2016 . Malmö, Sweden . 1500 m2 . Photos by André Pihl

 

“The resulting building imitates the gable silhouette of the existing building.

 

>>SELECTED PROJECTS

#20 A crisscross of generations

In the future Generation House in Aarhus housing and institutions are combined and children, young people, the elderly, the disabled and families share facilities.

Extract from our latest publication News in Nordic Architecture

“The building is rectangular with canals and water on two sides and tall neighbouring buildings including closely grouped buildings of 3-9 floors with varying facade materials.”

Architect: KPF Arkitekter & RUM Arkitekter . 2016 . Aarhus, Denmark . 27,400 m2

 

>>SELECTED PROJECTS

#19 Indoor activities

As the days get shorter and the weather colder it is time to explore the activities and architecture of indoor sport facilities.

Extracts from our latest publication News in Nordic Architecture

 

Ørestad Ice Ink
“The ice rink is uniquely located in Copenhagen in a dense urban area with facades facing public institutions, public parks and the new arena. The building’s facade is characterised by glass, concrete and wood. The roof has green planting and solar cells.”


Christensen & Co Architects . 2016 . Copenhagen, Denmark . 5,500 m2 . Photos by Adam Mørk

 

 

Thorvald Ellegaard Arena
“The racing track is lowered in the terrain. The large covered volume of membrane is visually freed as an independent form. The building consists mainly of lightweight membrane solutions which have limited weight and relatively small material consumption”

 
Architect: Mikkelsen Arkitekter . 2017 . Odense, Denmark . 7,200 m2 . Photos by Søren Aagaard

 

 

Oslo Skatehall
“The building’s form is inspired by movement and elements from skate-boarding. The building facades are cladded with perforated aluminium sheets and are adorned with Morse code signals, transcribed from the 1978 Norwegian law against use and sale of skateboards.”

 
Architect: Dark Arkitekter . 2017 . Oslo, Norway . 2,330 m2 + 620 m2 skatepark . Photos by Lars Gartå

>>SELECTED PROJECTS

#18 A long tradition of  ‘cold water’ bathing continues

Turning away from the coastline, this bathhouse opens up to the free horizon with a view of the archipelago

Extract from our latest publication News in Nordic Architecture

“The sense, sight and motion of the seascape inspire the design, a sharply angled volume in wood. Located on a beach promenade Kallbadhus is elevated three metres above sea level by thin columns.”

Architect: White Arkitekter . 2016 . Karlshamn, Sweden . 300 m2 . Photos by Bert Leandersson

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#17 Facade folded like origami

The aim was to utilise the light optimally both inside the apartments and in connection with the facade

Extract from our previous publication A New Golden Age – Housing

“The faceted facades have varying expressions and different character when the light and weather change. This gives the building a diverse expression over the day and months, leaving an impression of a welcoming and changeable building.”

Architect: Mangor & Nagel . 2016 . Ørestad South, Copenhagen . 4,750 m2 . Photos by Tom Jersøe

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#16 Vacation in the westerly wind

While the rain falls and the wind blows Holiday Home Henne is hiding in the big dunes at the Danish west coast perfectly suited for the rough weather.

Extract from our latest publication A New Golden Age Nordic Housing

“The climate is tough with an almost constant strong westerly wind. The house has a courtyard facing south to embrace the light and sunshine, and to provide shelter. The irregular shape of the house is the result of optimising space with direct views to the sea.”

Architect: Mette Lange Architects . 2012 . Henne, Denmark . 118 m2 . Photos by Mette Lange, Anders Linnet

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#15 Housing in greenery scenes

The project stretches into the green landscape like splayed fingers and draws these green qualities in between the houses

Extract from our latest publication A New Golden Age Nordic Architecture & Landscape

“The project’s primary relationship with the urban and landscape elements can be seen in that the building complex is oriented towards the Eastern urban quarter, and towards the Southern green aspect and the nearby lake.”

Architect: Arcasa Architects . 2010-11 . Fornebu, Norway . 3,600 m2 . Photos by Arcasa architects

>> SELECTED PROJECTS

#14 Finnish luxury housing for everyone

The Baltic Sea and the beautiful archipelago of Helsinki is an active part of the new Eiranranta residential building in Helsinki

Extract from our latest publication A New Golden Age Nordic Housing

“The three marine housing blocks contain different apartment types, e.g. for families, elderly people and for students or other people living alone. All dwellings have a view over the sea from the main living spaces. The balconies and large panorama windows make the light and surroundings become part of each dwelling.”

Architect: Helin & Co Architects . 2008 . Helsinki, Finland . 10,000 m2 (45 housing units between 80-270 m2) . Photos by Michael Perlmutter

>> SELECTED PROJECTS

#12 Three Tile Types

Zooming in on architectural values of a 15-storey student housing to low family terraced dwellings and a luxury villa.

Extract from our publication A New Golden Age Nordic Housing,  Architecture and Landscape, Architecture and Design

Campus Hall
A penthouse feeling and a spectacular view of the surroundings is everyday life for the students at the Campus Hall.
“The residences are located in three interconnected 15-storey buildings with no front or back, designed to appear attractive from a 360-degree perspective.”

Architect: C.F. Møller . 2015 . Odense, Denmark . 13,700 m2 . 250 housing units . Photos by Torben Eskerod .
Received award: Odense Municipality Architecture award 2016

 

Artillerihaven
Sustainable living with roof vegetation working as isolation in the winter and heat reduction in the summer. The green roof also collects rainwater for evaporation.
“The terraced houses are located facing the newly created harbor inlet with beach and bathing. The massive inflow of light gives the sensation of the outdoor views being dragged into the living rooms.”

Architect: Mangor & Nagel Architects . 2014 . Islands Brygge, Copenhagen, Denmark . 10,000 m2 . 58 housing units . Photos by Tom Jersø

 

Villa Albertsen
Clean lines, simple details and natural materials creates a luxurious feeling for the family life in this villa.
“The villa enjoys a special front row position directly overlooking Aarhus Bay. The view to the horizon has inspired a horizontal design right down to the extended oblong brick format. The outlook and the landscape are omnipresent in this villa, and space has been created to be experienced both from the interior and in traversing through to the terrace.”

Architect: Luplau & Poulsen Arkitekter . 2007 . Aarhus, Denmark . 750 m2 . Photos by Luplau & Poulsen, Brahl Fotografi

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